Allergies

More than 99 percent of Americans enjoy peanuts without any issue. But food allergy reactions can be unpredictable and must be taken seriously. America’s peanut farmers are mothers and fathers, grandmothers and grandfathers who know how it feels to want to protect the ones they love. Get the latest news and information about peanut allergies here. 

New Course Helps Providers Champion Allergy Prevention

Peanut Allergy Prevention through Early Introduction – a new online Pedialink CE course from the American Academy of Pediatrics – is available free to healthcare providers who work with young infants.

New Resource for Managing Peanut Ingredients in Food Processing Facilities

Controlling food allergens in processing environments can be a challenging but not impossible task. Brands and manufacturers from small to large often have questions or concerns about managing allergens, specifically peanut, in their facilities. The National Peanut Board has partnered with the renowned Food Allergy Research and Resource Program (FARRP) to create “Controlling Peanut Ingredients in Food Processing Facilities,” a free, downloadable roadmap for processors to develop and implement allergen control plans, with a specific focus on controlling peanut ingredients. 

How to be Fearless About Food Allergies in Schools

More than 98 percent of school-age children can enjoy peanuts without any issue and food allergies can be safely managed in schools while still making them available to non-allergic students.

Peanut Allergy in U.S. Adults: On the rise?

In February, a new study was published showing a significant rise in the numbers of adults with peanut allergy in the U.S.

Baby-Led Weaning & Early Introduction of Top Allergens

The way we feed babies has changed dramatically over the past twenty years or so. While not a new approach to the introduction of solid foods, “baby-led weaning” (BLW) has become more mainstream and understood as a beneficial and viable option with evidence-based short- and long-term benefits. Scientific evidence supporting the early introduction of top allergenic foods during infancy for the prevention of food allergies has also grown. In fact, the new 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend offering top allergens (egg, peanut, tree nut, cow’s milk, fish, shellfish, soy, and wheat) early and often starting at about 6 months of age when babies are showing signs of readiness for complementary foods (in conversation with the pediatrician if babies are at high risk for food allergies).[vii] The good news is that BLW is incredibly compatible with the early introduction of top allergens and can ease the process of offering these foods during infancy.

How to Talk to Your Doctor about Introducing Peanuts to Baby

With so much already to talk about during infant well visits, when it’s time to introduce solid foods to your healthy baby, you may wonder how to have that conversation with your provider—especially when it comes to feeding your baby potentially allergenic foods like peanuts for the first time. It’s important to note that introducing peanut foods as early as 4-6 months can reduce the risk of developing a peanut allergy by up to 86%. In fact, the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans state, “Introducing peanut-containing foods in the first year reduces the risk that an infant will develop a food allergy to peanuts.”

To empower new parents to discuss introducing peanut foods and other potential allergens with their providers, new mom Katie Brown recently talked with pediatrician Dr. JJ Levenstein.

Food Allergy Prevention: Simple, Actionable Advice for Parents

The new Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGAs) were released at the end of December. If you missed the announcement, then you also missed a critical insight for healthcare providers and new parents to help bring an end to a public health challenge simply by being intentional about when and what we feed infants.v

5 Important Takeaways for Pregnancy and Babies in the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans

It’s an exciting time in the world of nutrition! USDA has released the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, our national nutrition guidance document that comes out just once every five years. (U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2020)

Free Webinar for Health Professional Credit

Food allergies have become a public health concern, with up to 10.8% of adults and 6-8% of children believed to be food allergic. Health professionals—from family doctors and physician assistants to nurse practitioners and registered dietitians—have an important role to play in reducing the risk of developing food allergies in the next generation.

Parents Have the Power to Help in the Prevention of Peanut Allergy

Food allergies occur in approximately 8% of kids, with peanut allergies reported in 2.2% of US children.  Because peanut allergy is outgrown less frequently than other allergies like milk and egg, it has become an increasing public health concern, as well as a source of anxiety and common topic of conversation amongst parents.  Surely you may already have felt the “peanut panic” amongst some of your fellow parents, in the media, and even within your own families.

    

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