Allergies

More than 99 percent of Americans enjoy peanuts without any issue. But food allergy reactions can be unpredictable and must be taken seriously. America’s peanut farmers are mothers and fathers, grandmothers and grandfathers who know how it feels to want to protect the ones they love. Get the latest news and information about peanut allergies here. 

Peanut Allergies: From Poster Child to Practical Progress

Some people may say that peanuts are the “poster child” for food allergies. While less than one percent of Americans (including less than two percent of children) have a peanut allergy, the average American thinks 24 percent of people do. When you search the phrase “food allergies” online, peanuts are the focus of the majority of results. In the media and in discussions of food allergies in public places like restaurants, schools and airplanes, peanuts are commonly the focus. But is being the poster child always a negative?

How School Nutrition Experts Serve Peanuts and Peanut Butter

Kids love the great taste of peanut butter, and school nutrition professionals love the protein and other key nutrients of this American staple. Some schools, however, struggle with managing peanut products due to concerns about food allergies. Others are unsure of how to use peanut butter as an ingredient in meals beyond the typical PB&J. We sat down with two experts in K-12 school nutrition to get their insights on the importance of peanut butter in nutrition programs, advice on managing food allergies, and culinary tips to elevate school meals with peanut butter.

It's Peanut Butter Time, Baby!

Introducing new foods into your baby’s diet is exciting and consistent research is showing that adding peanut products as early as 4-6 months can help reduce their risk of developing a peanut allergy later on in life.

Have fun introducing your little one to peanut butter by adding it to easy recipes that the whole family will love.

Food allergy mom helps parents overcome anxiety about early peanut introduction

When it comes to your children, you want to keep them safe, and have their best interest at heart. New guidelines recommend introducing peanut foods to infants as early as 4-6 months, which can be understandingly scary for parents.

In this Q&A Eleanor Garrow-Holding, President and CEO of Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Connection Team (FAACT) and food allergy mom, shares her view and experience, to help ease parents’ fear.

How to be Fearless About Food Allergies in Schools

More than 98 percent of school-age children can enjoy peanuts without any issue and food allergies can be safely managed in schools while still making them available to non-allergic students.

Recipe Video: 8 Ways to Introduce Peanuts Early

With the latest research suggesting early peanut introduction, we’ve rounded up eight ways on how to feed peanut butter to baby.

Turning six months was a big milestone for our sweet baby boy. He started crawling forward on his half birthday, cut two teeth, began pulling himself to standing and started solid foods. He’s still our happy go lucky baby and it’s been fun to watch him discover new things, especially as we begin our baby led weaning journey.

PreventPeanutAllergies .org: A Resource for Parents

When new guidelines for early introduction of peanut foods to prevent a peanut allergy were released by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), they offered hope and help to families everywhere.  And, while many parents and pediatricians have embraced and followed the guidelines, research shows that many more parents need information and support before acting. To bridge the gap, the National Peanut Board (NPB) launched a campaign that builds awareness of the guidelines, provides easy-to-follow resources and aims to help parents overcome concerns and fears. Visit PreventPeanutAllergies.org from more information.

This Pediatrician Says Feeding Peanut Foods to Your Infant Just Got Easier With a New Puff Snack

No longer should parents withhold the introduction of peanut foods from their infants until toddlerhood. In fact, new guidelines from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) now recommend feeding peanut foods to infants as early as 4 to 6 months of age, depending on their risk for allergies, to prevent peanut allergy.  Dr. Ron Sunog, is a pediatrician who helped develop Puffworks® baby.  We sat down with him to find out more about the new guidelines, and how this product can help make early introduction easier.     

Back to School: Proper Food Allergy Diagnosis and Management

Eleanor Garrow Holding, president & CEO of FAACT, shares her perspective on the purpose and importance of developing a proper food allergy diagnosis and management plan when sending your food-allergic child(ren) back to school: It’s that time of year again, back-to-school, which can be stressful for many parents of children who suffer from food allergies. 

How to Start Feeding Your Baby Solid Foods

Adding solids to your baby’s diet is an exciting milestone, for you and your child.  But it can be confusing, especially when it comes to food allergies.  Here are answers to common questions so you can feed your baby with confidence.

    

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