Sustainability

U.S. peanut farmers believed in the sustainability of our natural resources long before it became popular. Farmers invest in the land and research to ensure a sustainable future. Discover the latest advances in research, technology and sustainable farming techniques here. 

These 3 Young Women are Redefining What It Means to be a Farmer, and Shaping the Future of the Industry

The image that comes to mind for many Americans when they hear the word farmer is an older man in dusty overalls not unlike the portrait painted in Grant Wood’s American Gothic. While that is a quaint notion, it hardly conforms to the reality of today’s diverse and innovative agricultural industry. We spoke with three young, female peanut farmers who are challenging the conventional stereotype of farmers, and are poised to become the next generation of leaders in the industry. They are helping to shape the future of the peanut industry, and proving that farming is diverse, technologically advanced, and anything but quaint.

How Farms Help Communities Thrive

The average peanut farm is about 200 acres.  Farmers work closely with their local community agriculture businesses to sell and distribute their harvests, maintain farm equipment and invest in their land. For many rural areas, farmers are an economic and social keystone; linking neighbors in a web of social and economic relationships and contributing to local causes.

Restaurants & Water: Foodservice industry makes strides towards sustainability except in one key area

One-third of consumers worldwide prefer to buy food from sustainable brands.

That’s according to a recent surveyof 20,000 adults from five countries, including the U.S, which was conducted by Unilever – a transnational consumer goods company. 

After attending Menus of Change(MOC), an annual summit hosted by the Culinary Institute of America and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, I learned how the food service industry is making moves to listen to consumers’ concerns. The good news is that chefs and other food service leaders are working to improve environmental health – but there is still great need for change in one specific area: water sustainability.

Plastic Straws and Peanut Seeds: Think Small for Big Impact

Peanut breeders are thinking small and innovating with peanuts seeds to improve the sustainability of peanut production. Developing new varieties that maximize peanuts’ already sustainable traits can help reduce the environmental impact of peanut farming, make production more cost-effective for farmers, and make peanuts one of the most sustainable crops.

Why Self-Pollination is a Good Thing for Peanuts…and Us

Peanuts are one of the most sustainable and environmentally-friendly food sources available today.  A feature of its growing cycle—self-pollination—makes peanuts environmentally-friendly. Self-pollination means peanuts do not require outside aid—such as bees, other insects or the wind—to carry pollen from one plant to another in reproduction. Very few plants pollinate independently of insects, bees or wind. Self-pollination is most often seen in legumes (peanuts are legumes) and in many kinds of orchids, peas, sunflowers and daisies.

Why This Culinary Dietitian Loves Peanut Milk

As someone who loves efficiency, if I can find a product that works fabulously as a culinary ingredient and a stellar source of nutrition, it’s love at first sight. As the first peanut milk ever to hit the market, Elmhurst’s Milked Peanuts is a powerful plant-based beverage that serves up six grams of protein per cup, with a peanut lover’s dream taste.

Chef of Love Shares His Passion for Food, Social Media & Sustainability

Chef Jernard Wells is the self-proclaimed Chef of Love. Famous for his time spent on Food Network Star and Cutthroat Kitchen, Chef Jernard believes food and love go hand-in-hand and wants everyone to know how easy cooking can be – and how much excitement it can add to your life. The National Peanut Board sat down and dug into how the Chef of Love shares his passion for food, social media, and of course, peanuts.

    

You must be logged in to view this item.

This area is reserved for members of the news media. If you qualify, please update your user profile and check the box marked "Check here to register as an accredited member of the news media". Please include any notes in the "Supporting information for media credentials" box. We will notify you of your status via e-mail in one business day.