Biology, Ecology and Management of Insect Pests of Peanut in the Southeast US

Institution:

Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia on behalf of the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service and University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc.

Budget ID:

1306

Project ID:

413

Report BID:

State:

Alabama

Region:

Southeast (GA, FL, AL)

State Group:

AL-84

Project Fiscal Year:

2014

Category:

Pest/Disease

Report Type:

Report Received Date:

Investigator:

Balkcom

Project NPB Budget:

$14,000
Peanut plots were established at the Wiregrass Research and Extension Center (Headland, AL) and Brewton Ag Research Unit (Brewton, AL) to test new insecticides/miticides. Caterpillar control products included nvo insect growth regulators for comparison (novaluron and diflubenzuron), two stomach poisons (flubendiamide and one insecticide premix with lambda cyhalothrin+chlorantraniliprole), and one biological insecticide (a more bioactive species of Bacillus thuringiensis). These products are more selective for pest management than conventional products that protect natural enemies. We also included t\vo test plots for spider mite control. We monitored insect pests ( 6 species of major caterpillars) at 6 locations using sticky wing pheromone trap and co-developed a phone app 
(MyTraps) with Spensa Technologies to archive insect counts for sharing statewide with Regional Extension Agents, crop specialists, and crop advisors/industry. Results indicated prolonged (14-d) control of insect pests with new selective chemicals which is better than synthetic 
pyrethroids. Our data suggests that selective insecticides can be used in rotation with pyrethroids to avoid spider mite outbreaks during hot weather (July/ August). Other 1PM details 
from the studies will be shared via production meetings in 2016. The spider mite test was unsuccessful this year (even after multiple synthetic pyrethroid applications) due to frequent rainfall and other weather patterns. This effort will continue in 2016 with peanuts grown under special conditions to increase spider mite populations and generate data in order to register miticides. 

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