Allergies

More than 99 percent of Americans enjoy peanuts without any issue. But food allergy reactions can be unpredictable and must be taken seriously. America’s peanut farmers are mothers and fathers, grandmothers and grandfathers who know how it feels to want to protect the ones they love. Get the latest news and information about peanut allergies here. 

5 Important Takeaways for Pregnancy and Babies in the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans

It’s an exciting time in the world of nutrition! USDA has released the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, our national nutrition guidance document that comes out just once every five years. (U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2020)

Free Webinar for Health Professional Credit

Food allergies have become a public health concern, with up to 10.8% of adults and 6-8% of children believed to be food allergic. Health professionals—from family doctors and physician assistants to nurse practitioners and registered dietitians—have an important role to play in reducing the risk of developing food allergies in the next generation.

Parents Have the Power to Help in the Prevention of Peanut Allergy

Food allergies occur in approximately 8% of kids, with peanut allergies reported in 2.2% of US children.  Because peanut allergy is outgrown less frequently than other allergies like milk and egg, it has become an increasing public health concern, as well as a source of anxiety and common topic of conversation amongst parents.  Surely you may already have felt the “peanut panic” amongst some of your fellow parents, in the media, and even within your own families.

Feeding Babies Peanut Foods Just Got a Lot Easier

Many parents are aware of the benefits of introducing common allergens early, but keeping peanut foods in baby’s diet is an important piece of the prevention puzzle. Parents had few ready-to-serve choices in the past, but options continue to grow and expand with some exciting new entries in the peanut-for-baby category.

Can Breastfeeding Prevent Food Allergies?

August is Breastfeeding Awareness Month, and a great time to talk about some of the benefits of and surprising facts about breastfeeding. Here's what the research shows about breastfeeding and food allergies.

Taking Aim at Peanut Allergy Prevention, Mission MightyMe Launches New Infant Food

Mission MightyMe co-founders J.J. and Catherine Jaxon are on a mission to help raise up a generation of kids that are free from the burden of food allergies. And they’re doing it with the launch of a peanut puff that makes it easy and “normal” to feed peanuts and other allergenic foods to infants.

Peanut Allergies: From Poster Child to Practical Progress

Some people may say that peanuts are the “poster child” for food allergies. While less than 1% of Americans (including less than 2% of children) have a peanut allergy, the average American thinks 24% of people do. When you search the phrase “food allergies” online, peanuts are the focus of the majority of results. In the media and in discussions of food allergies in public places like restaurants, schools and airplanes, peanuts are commonly the focus. But is being the poster child always a negative?

How School Nutrition Experts Serve Peanuts and Peanut Butter

Kids love the great taste of peanut butter, and school nutrition professionals love the protein and other key nutrients of this American staple. Some schools, however, struggle with managing peanut products due to concerns about food allergies. Others are unsure of how to use peanut butter as an ingredient in meals beyond the typical PB&J. We sat down with two experts in K-12 school nutrition to get their insights on the importance of peanut butter in nutrition programs, advice on managing food allergies, and culinary tips to elevate school meals with peanut butter.

Food allergy mom helps parents overcome anxiety about early peanut introduction

When it comes to your children, you want to keep them safe, and have their best interest at heart. New guidelines recommend introducing peanut foods to infants as early as 4-6 months, which can be understandingly scary for parents.

In this Q&A Eleanor Garrow-Holding, President and CEO of Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Connection Team (FAACT) and food allergy mom, shares her view and experience, to help ease parents’ fear.

Recipe Video: 8 Ways to Introduce Peanuts Early

With the latest research suggesting early peanut introduction, we’ve rounded up eight ways on how to feed peanut butter to baby.

Turning six months was a big milestone for our sweet baby boy. He started crawling forward on his half birthday, cut two teeth, began pulling himself to standing and started solid foods. He’s still our happy go lucky baby and it’s been fun to watch him discover new things, especially as we begin our baby led weaning journey.

         

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